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Judge Anthony Kelly has just read out a minute agreed to by both the government and Djokovic, where he quashes the decision to cancel Novak Djokovic’s visa, orders government to pay costs, and for Djokovic to be released from detention in 30 minutes with his passport and personal effects released to him.

The minute notes Djokovic was allowed until 8.30am when he was originally detained to respond to the notification to cancel his visa, but the decision was made at 7.42am.

It also found if the player had had more time he could have consulted wider and responded further than he was able to.

Follow our live blog on the verdict here.

More on the Novak Djokovic court appeal as the tennis star makes a bid to reinstate his Australian visa.

The hearing is back underway in the federal circuit court after a long adjournment earlier today.

About one hour ago a white van left the Park Hotel after Djokovic was allowed to move to another, unknown address, so he can watch the court proceedings remotely.

Christopher Tran, counsel for the federal government, flagged that the injunction keeping Novak Djokovic in Australia is due to expire on Monday afternoon and Judge Anthony Kelly extended it to 8pm which means the hearing will be hopefully finalised today.

The expedited hearing comes ahead of a looming Tennis Australia deadline of Tuesday for Djokovic to be included in the draw to play the Australian Open.

Here’s a useful rundown of the first half of the hearing below.

Some of Thailand’s tourism hotspots will reopen to fully vaccinated international tourists from Tuesday, as the country tries to balance the risks posed by the Omicron variant with the need to boost the travel sector.

Tourists will be able to enter Krabi, Phang-Nga, Ko Samui, Ko Pha-ngan and Ko Tao, provided they stay at an approved hotel for at least seven days. Phuket reopened in July last year under a similar arrangement, which also requires tourists to be tested prior to and during their stay.

From Tuesday, tourists in Thailand will be able to enter Krabi, Phang-Nga, Ko Samui, Ko Pha-ngan and Ko Tao (pictured) provided they stay at an approved hotel for at least seven days.
From Tuesday, tourists in Thailand will be able to enter Krabi, Phang-Nga, Ko Samui, Ko Pha-ngan and Ko Tao (pictured) provided they stay at an approved hotel for at least seven days. Photograph: Cavan Images/Alamy

Thailand’s tourism industry has been devastated by the pandemic. Almost 40 million foreigners arrived in Thailand in 2019, but visitor numbers fell to just 6.7 million in 2020 as Covid-19 halted international travel. The government previously eased entry requirements across the country last year in an attempt to boost the economy, but then suspended arrivals late in December in response to the emergence of the Omicron variant.

To reduce infections, the government has also encouraged people to work from home, and has banned the consumption of alcohol in restaurants after 9pm in high risk areas, including the capital Bangkok.

Thailand has vaccinated roughly 70% of the population. On Monday, 7,926 new cases and 13 deaths were reported.