Novak Djokovic ‘waiting’ on Australian Open fate and opens up on true feelings over US ban

Novak Djokovic is hoping for “positive news soon” about his return to Australia next year after insisting he has no regrets about missing the US Open. The Wimbledon champion is returning to action this week at the Laver Cup after missing the North American hardcourt season because he refuses to get vaccinated. The Serb, 35 was deported from Australia in January and faced a three-year ban from re-entering the country.

But reports Down Under earlier this month claimed the new Australian government is ready to allow Djokovic back in 2023 if he applies to return. Speaking at The O2, the world No.7 said: “I’m waiting for the news. It’s really not in my hands right now. I’m hoping I can get some positive news soon.”

Djokovic missed out on a calendar Grand Slam when he lost the US Open final last year. Earlier this month teenager Carlos Alcaraz started a potential new era in tennis by winning his first Grand Slam.

Asked if he had any regrets, the Serb said: “No, I don’t have any regrets. I do feel sad that I wasn’t able to play, but that was the decision that I made. I knew what the consequences would be, so I accepted them. That’s it.

“I congratulate Alcaraz for winning the US Open. He did it in an incredible fashion in three or four five-setter matches in the tournament. He’s 19 years old and already No. 1 in the world.

“It’s quite amazing what he has achieved so far. He’s a great addition to our sport, a great star in making. He’s already become a Grand Slam champion, so we can’t speak about him as the future, because he’s already a present.

“I’m just excited to be able to play here now and most of the rest of the indoor season.”

Meanwhile, Djokovic was also asked about his favourite Roger Federer memory, with the legendary Swiss star to retire from professional tennis following his doubles match with Rafael Nadal in London on Friday.

He replied: “I’ll pick my first Grand Slam final, US Open 2007. I lost that match. That was the first Grand Slam final obviously, it was remarkable experience for me at the time. It was kind of the first match that allowed me to believe that I belonged to that level.

“And 2019, sorry, Roger, final of Wimbledon.”